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Flying thru Hipparcos Tycho Catalog - Astronomy
 
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(2007) This is a real-time 3D fly-through of the 2,533,774 stars of the Hipparcos and Tycho stellar catalogs. A GPU-based renderer computes the apparent magnitude of each star from any point in 3D space and displays each with a gaussian distribution colored by spectral type. Implemented using the Electro framework, this application runs across a cluster of 29 Linux PCs driving the 55 LCDs of the 105 million-pixel LambdaVision at the Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL). The flight begins by circling the Hyades cluster and proceeds toward the center of the galaxy before turning to pass by the Sun. The mesh of blue lines indicates the true 3D shape of the 88 constellations. More information can be found on the EVL website -- http://www.evl.uic.edu/core.php?mod=4&type=1&indi=296 http://www.evl.uic.edu/core.php?mod=4&type=1&indi=273
Views: 4688 evltube
The Tycho Catalog Skymap - Version 2.0
 
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This movie is a sample tour of a skymap of stars from the Tycho and Hipparcos star catalogs, provided by the ESO/ECF generic catalog server. The maps are plotted in plate carrée projection (Cylindrical-Equidistant) using celestial coordinates making them suitable for mapping onto spheres in many popular animation programs. It starts looking at the North Celestial Pole (the Little Dipper is visible). We then make short trips to the Big Dipper, the Summer Triangle (Cygnus, Lyra, and Aquila), the Orion and Taurus region, southward to Canis Major, and over to Scorpius and Saggitarius. The movie ends pointed at the South Celestial Pole (the Southern Cross is visible to the right). Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio
Views: 441 djxatlanta
KStars how to download add-ons / extra star catalogs
 
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I am showing how to download different add-ons. For the example I have downloaded extra star catalogs Tycho-2 and USNO NOMAD
Views: 329 KStarsPlanetarium
Hipparcos Star Catalogue
 
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I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 122 Bayeauxz
The Mountains of Tycho
 
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This height map visualises the hot star temperature density of the TGAS data set binned to the galactic plane. The arrow points in the direction of the galactic nucleus. The sun is at the centre of the image. The radius of the image is 800 pc. I have labelled the four major concentrations of hot stars in the solar neighbourhood. Hint: right click and choose the loop option. Best viewed full screen in HD resolution.
Views: 33 Kevin Jardine
Amazing 3D Journey to the Hyades Star Cluster | Video
 
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More space news and info at: http://www.coconutsciencelab.com - a virtual journey, from our Solar System through the Milky Way, based on data from the first release of ESA’s Gaia satellite. The journey starts by looking back at the Sun, surrounded by its eight planets. We then move away from the Sun and travel towards and around the Hyades star cluster, the closest open cluster to the Solar System, some 150 light-years away. The 3D positions of the stars shown in the animation are drawn from the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS), which combines information from Gaia’s first year of observations with the earlier Hipparcos and Tycho-2 Catalogues, both based on data from ESA’s Hipparcos mission. This new data set contains positions on the sky, distances and proper motions of over two million stars. It is twice as precise and contains almost 20 times as many stars as the previous reference for astrometry, the Hipparcos Catalogue. The journey continues showing the full extent size of the stars contained in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution, all relatively near to the Sun, in the overall context of our Milky Way galaxy. The final Gaia catalogue will contain the most detailed 3D map ever made of the Galaxy, charting a billion stars – about 1% of the Milky Way’s stellar content – to unprecedented accuracy. Video Credits: ESA/Gaia/DPAC Acknowledgement: S. Jordan & T. Sagristà Sellés (Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg)
Views: 1335 CoconutScienceLab
Part 3: Catalogs & Data
 
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Learn about star and deep sky objects catalogs in KStars. How to update existing data? How to download new catalogs? If download of USNO NOMAD 1.4GB catalog is problematic, follow this guide: http://knro.blogspot.com/2017/03/how-to-get-100-million-stars-in-kstars.html
Views: 502 Stellar Mate
Star Catalog
 
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Views: 28 Alex Grab
The Earliest Star Catalogs
 
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The earliest star catalogs are over six thousand years old, but the stories are even older.
Views: 155 AS N
Above & Beyond Acoustic - Full Concert Film Live from Porchester Hall (Official)
 
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Above & Beyond Acoustic returns in 2016: http://aboveandbeyond.nu/acoustic Pre-order the album on iTunes: http://bit.ly/ABAcoustic-iTunes Pre-order the Special Edition Book: http://bit.ly/ABAcoustic-DVD Click here now to subscribe to THUMP: http://bit.ly/Subscribe_to_THUMP Click here now to subscribe to Above & Beyond:https://www.youtube.com/aboveandbeyond Earlier this year, Above & Beyond performed some of their best-loved songs acoustically as part of a 15-piece band, across four sold out shows at London's famous Porchester Hall. The response from fans was overwhelming and led to two sold-out nights at The Greek Theater in Los Angeles in October, described by Billboard Magazine as "one of the finest and more memorable shows in EDM history." Above & Beyond partnered with THUMP on the production and filming of the London shows to create a concert film that captures the Porchester Hall performances and the story behind the acoustic project. The songs performed at Porchester Hall also form the basis of the "Above & Beyond Acoustic" studio album, which was recorded in the spring and summer of 2013 and features a 24-piece orchestra. Above & Beyond: https://twitter.com/aboveandbeyond https://www.facebook.com/aboveandbeyond _______________________________ THUMP is the world's newest authority on electronic everything: http://thu.mp _______________________________ Check out our full video catalog: http://youtube.com/user/thumpchannel/... Facebook: http://fb.com/thumpthump Twitter: http://twitter.com/thumpthump Tumblr: http://thump.tumblr.com/ _______________________________ THUMP is the world's newest authority on electronic everything: http://thu.mp _______________________________ Check out our full video catalog: http://youtube.com/user/thumpchannel/videos Facebook: http://fb.com/thumpthump Twitter: http://twitter.com/thumpthump Tumblr: http://thump.tumblr.com/
Views: 5316437 THUMP
Before Telescopes 7  Tycho Brahe & Joannes Kepler
 
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Before Telescopes A History of Astronomy series by John Dillon. Exploring what early astronomers learned without telescopes—just sharp eyes and sharp minds— is a good way to understand the basics of observational astronomy. RFO in Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Kenwood, (Sonoma County) CA www.rfo.org
Mapping M31 to a star chart
 
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This video shows the results of the algorithm implemented in my astrophotography software to map images to a star chart. The star chart ist generated from a combination of star catalogs (Hipparcos, Tycho-2 and UCAC4) and is quite complete for stars up to 16th magnitude. Then an iterative algorithm based on Newton's algorithm finds the parameters of transformation that best maps an image to to the star charts, so that the stars are never off more than one pixel. In the video, a single exposure made with an old 135mm telephoto lens and a Starlight Express SXVR M26C was processed using this algorithm. One can conclude that the limiting magnitude of the image was about 14th magnitude. Pixel size corresponds to about 9 arc sec.
Views: 249 Andreas Müller
Starscream - Future, And It Doesn't Work (Full Album) Chiptune
 
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Subscribe here and follow there: Twitter ➤ https://twitter.com/AndersEriksonYT - If you're a chiptune/electronic/VG remix musician and would like your work featured, send me a message! Also: if you happen to be an appreciator of any of those genres, video games, random fandom and whatever else I get into- stay tuned and don't go anywhere (except to my next video). _________________________________________________________________ Starscream's 'Future, And It Doesn't Work' album in its entirety. Note: The band changed their name to 'Infinity Shred' to differentiate themselves from another act with the same name and moved away from the chip scene in favor of a more post rock/80's electronic approach. 1. Rise of Space 2. Space Party Anthem 3. Gravity in Terms of Space-Time 4. Kepler's Star Catalog 5. Future, And It Doesn't Work This album and more can be downloaded for free at: http://www.8bitpeoples.com/discography I'll be uploading many more chiptune albums/songs soon, so stay tuned! Note: I own nothing. I try to upload work by relatively low-key musicians to bring their creations into a bigger spotlight and sometimes have their permission beforehand. If you like what you hear, click on the link I posted up there and buy straight from them. Support the artist.
Views: 42331 Xenysys
ESA Star Mapper demo
 
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The ESA Star Mapper visualisation is an exploration of some central aspects of astrometric star catalogues, using data from ESA's Hipparcos mission. Star Mapper can be accessed at http://sci.esa.int/star-mapper. Further details can be found at http://sci.esa.int/hipparcos/58154-star-mapper ESA's Star Mapper visualisation was developed for the European Space Agency by Jan Willem Tulp (TULP interactive) with support from Jos de Bruijne (ESA), Karen O'Flaherty (EJR-Quartz for ESA) and Claudia Mignone (Vitrociset Belgium for ESA). Video credit: ESA/Science Office More information about this video can be found at http://sci.esa.int/hipparcos/59486-esa-star-mapper-visualisation-demo
ASMR - Astronomy book reading
 
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Hello people ! Interested in learning more about the universe ? 🌌 In this video, I present you this astronomy book I've had for some years now : Catalogue of the universe. We flip all the pages and stop from time to time to look at the picutres, or to ready interesting parts about the milky way, the sun, the moon, Tycho's star and the horsehead nebula. Here are some useful timings for you : 3:18 : The book summary 7:44 : The universe of galaxies 17:47 : Our galaxy : the milky way 20:56 : Stars and nebulae 26:09 : The horsehead nebula 31:02 : Tycho's star, or Tycho's supernova 37:50 : The sun 47:04 : The moon ASMRachael gave me the idea of doing this video with her ASMR astronomy book video, you can go check it out here : https://youtu.be/bKey41ODZHM You can find this book secondhand rather easily I think, if you wish to read it : http://amzn.to/2ChjmJE I hope you enjoyed the video, please let me know what kind of videos you would like to see next in the comment section. If you wish to support me, you can do so by becoming one of my patrons on Patreon : https://www.patreon.com/Behindthemoons You can also follow me on twitter and instagram to be updated on videos recordings and everything behind the scene : https://twitter.com/BehindTheMoons0 Instagram : BehindTheMoons Thank you !
Views: 25224 BehindTheMoons
Tycho 2
 
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This video was uploaded from an Android phone.
360º Skyview of Billion Stars from Gaia DR2 and Hipparcos Catalogues
 
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This is a realistic 360º night sky image of 1.3 billion stars from GAIA DR2 and Hipparcos Catalogues. By stopping the movie and setting 8k, full-screen, it might be usable like planetarium. Also, many clusters can be found in high resolution mode. The size and brightness of each star are proportional to actual brightness. Colors are also realistically calculated from effective temperatures assuming black body radiation. When Teff is not available from GAIA DR2, the relation between B-V or BP-RP and Teff is approximated and used. Stars without BP-RP or B-V are not shown. Full uploaded Image: http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k600.jpg Other versions of various luminosity: http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k900Func3Max2.jpg http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k900Func3Max3.jpg http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k1200Func3Max2.jpg http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k1800Func3Max2.jpg http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k3600Func3Max2.jpg http://archive.nomoto.org/pub/HippLiner/GAIADR2+Hipp2_8k3600Func3Max4.jpg Image Generation: NOMOTO Tomonori (http://T.NOMOTO.org/) Credit of Hipparcos catalog, ESA, 1997, The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues, ESA SP-1200. Credit of Hipparcos-2 catalog, "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction", F. van Leeuwen, A&A, 474, 653-664, (2007). Credit of GAIA DR2 cagtalog, This work has made use of data from the European Space Agency (ESA) mission Gaia (https://www.cosmos.esa.int/gaia), processed by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC, https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/dpac/consortium). Funding for the DPAC has been provided by national institutions, in particular the institutions participating in the Gaia Multilateral Agreement.
Views: 93 hippliner
Line 15f WOW SETI TT IAU Tycho-2  PERL STAR TIKI WIKI CMS GROUPWARE
 
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http://ideagirlseverestormpredictionswarnings.wordpress.com/ http://alienspacesciencenews.wordpress.com/ http://theideagirlsays.wordpress.com/ http://victoriastaffordapsychicinvestigation.wordpress.com/ http://www.twitter.com/theideagirl part 73 of 100 videos Math Equation: 31 3 111 11 1 Line 15a WOW SETI UFO Beijing Xinhua Badain Jaran Desert MAYA Cave Paintings Line 15b2 WOW SETI Yevgeny Zavoisky EPR EMF ALIEN MAYA CONTACT Fermions Zero Spin Lepton Index Line 15c WOW SETI Bosons Wave Function Spin Quantum Mechanics Newtons Optics Corpuscular Line 15d WOW SETI Black Holes Relativistic Jets XRAY Radio Thermal Radiation Extragalactic Line 15d2 SETI WOW ALIEN CONTACT INDEX THE IDEA GIRL SAYS Line 15e WOW SETI UFO Crop Circle ALIEN CONTACT STAR CHILD SKULL NGC3034 Line 15f WOW SETI TT IAU Tycho-2 PERL STAR TIKI WIKI CMS GROUPWARE Jan 16 2012 903 pm est My Thoughts: F Terrestrial Time (TT) is a time scale established by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Tycho-2 Catalogue PERL 6 STAR CATALOGUE My second set of Thoughts on Line 15f: Tycho-2 Catalogue STARs has more in it than the Messier Catalogue from the last video. I just looked at the Terrestrial Time and clicked on the link to check it out. Very cool it's an Astronomical Almanac and this is what it's all about. I was hoping to learn more about the positioning coordinates of stars and planets from Google Sky. To see if I'm saying it the right way. :) Quote: The Astronomical Almanac is a joint publication of the U. S. Nautical Almanac Office, United States Naval Observatory (USNO), in the United States and Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO), United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO), in the United Kingdom. The printed version contains precise ephemerides of the Sun, Moon, planets, and satellites, data for eclipses and other astronomical phenomena for a given year, and serves as a world-wide standard for such information. The online version extends the printed version by providing data best presented in machine-readable form. Pasted from http://asa.usno.navy.mil/index.html http://asa.usno.navy.mil/SecM/Glossary.html#itrs TIKI WIKI CMS GROUPWARE (Message to add it to the PERL program because it has over 40+ languages in its interface) is from Line 12 and Line 15 a, 15f where this program can be the answer to some of the problems that the PERL program is experiencing. I just found out today that PERL is used to extract star chart data. I knew it was some sort of computer program but now that I know what it's for I think it's cool that it came up so many times. For those of you working on the PERL program take a look at other inventions, data and things that came up up with this particular "word" during my searching. WOW SETI VIDEOS with the word "PERL" in the data - Line 9, 11a, 12, 14a, 14b, 15a, 15b, 15c, 15d, 15e, 15f and Line 23b (as of Jan 16, 2012)
Views: 174 theideagirlsays
From the Solar System to the Hyades cluster
 
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A virtual journey, from our Solar System through the Milky Way, based on data from the first release of ESA’s Gaia satellite. The journey starts by looking back at the Sun, surrounded by its eight planets. We then move away from the Sun and travel towards and around the Hyades star cluster, the closest open cluster to the Solar System, some 150 light-years away. The 3D positions of the stars shown in the animation are drawn from the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS), which combines information from Gaia’s first year of observations with the earlier Hipparcos and Tycho-2 Catalogues, both based on data from ESA’s Hipparcos mission. This new dataset contains positions on the sky, distances and proper motions of over two million stars. It is twice as precise and contains almost 20 times as many stars as the previous reference for astrometry, the Hipparcos Catalogue. The journey continues showing the full extent size of the stars contained in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution, all relatively near to the Sun, in the overall context of our Milky Way galaxy. The final Gaia catalogue will contain the most detailed 3D map ever made of the Galaxy, charting a billion stars – about 1% of the Milky Way’s stellar content – to unprecedented accuracy. For more information about Gaia, visit: http://www.esa.int/gaia Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC; Acknowledgement: S. Jordan & T. Sagristà Sellés (Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg)
Звёздные каталоги
 
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Передача "Собеседники". Эфир 20.06.2015. Гость передачи - учёный-астроном Евгений ФЕДОСЕЕВ. Первый образовательный канал. © Телекомпания СГУ ТВ. Другие передачи "Собеседники" смотрите на http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5E42B57DEAD54E56
360º past skyviews simulated using Gaia DR2 and Hipparcos catalogues
 
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This is a simulation of 360º night sky of past 400000 years plotting 0.9 billion stars from GAIA DR2 and Hipparcos Catalogues. You can see moving open clusters such as Hyades and Pleiades, and in-plane and out-of-plane motions of stars from milky way. I recommend to see the directions of Orion and Taurus constellations (right side of the original direction). Data from GAIA DR2 and Hipparcos-2 catalogues with colors and positive parallaxes are shown. Radial velocity is from GAIA DR2 and Hipparcos input catalogues. The overall size and brightness of each star is proportional to the brightness of the stars. Colors are also realistically calculated from effective temperatures assuming black body radiation. When Teff is not available from GAIA DR2, relations between B-V or BP-RP and Teff are approximated and used. Stars without BP-RP or B-V are not shown. Image Generation: NOMOTO Tomonori (http://t.nomoto.org/index-e.html) Credit of Hipparcos catalog, ESA, 1997, The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues, ESA SP-1200. Credit of Hipparcos-2 catalog, "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction", F. van Leeuwen, A&A, 474, 653-664, (2007). Credit of GAIA DR2 cagtalog, This work has made use of data from the European Space Agency (ESA) mission Gaia (https://www.cosmos.esa.int/gaia), processed by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC, https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/dpac/consortium). Funding for the DPAC has been provided by national institutions, in particular the institutions participating in the Gaia Multilateral Agreement.
Views: 67 hippliner
C2A Tutorial on ArasBeAM Catalog
 
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This tutorial shows how to us the Be Star ArasBeAM catalog with the C2A astronomy software (http://www.astrosurf.com/c2a/english).
Views: 1440 C2aAuthor
Timeline of astronomical maps, catalogs, and surveys | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_astronomical_maps,_catalogs,_and_surveys NaN:NaN:NaN Notes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7839384507436131 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Timeline of astronomical maps, catalogs and surveys c. 1800 BC — Babylonian star catalog (see Babylonian star catalogues) c. 1370 BC; Observations for the Babylonia MUL.APIN (an astro catalog). c. 350 BC — Shi Shen's star catalog has almost 800 entries c. 300 BC — star catalog of Timocharis of Alexandria c. 134 BC — Hipparchus makes a detailed star map c. 140 — Ptolemy completes his Almagest, which contains a catalog of stars, observations of planetary motions, and treatises on geometry and cosmology c. 705 — Dunhuang Star Chart, a manuscript star chart from the Mogao Caves at Dunhuang c. 750 — The first Zij treatise, Az-Zij ‛alā Sinī al-‛Arab, written by Ibrahim al-Fazari and Muhammad al-Fazari c. 777 — Yaqūb ibn Tāriq's Az-Zij al-Mahlul min as-Sindhind li-Darajat Daraja c. 830 — Muhammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī's Zij al-Sindhind c. 840 — Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Kathīr al-Farghānī's Compendium of the Science of the Stars c. 900 — Muhammad ibn Jābir al-Harrānī al-Battānī's Az-Zij as-Sabi 964 — Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi (Azophi)'s star catalog Book of the Fixed Stars 1031 — Abū Rayhān al-Bīrūnī's al-Qanun al-Mas'udi, making first use of a planisphere projection, and discussing the use of the astrolabe and the armillary sphere. 1088 — The first almanac is the Almanac of Azarqueil written by Abū Ishāq Ibrāhīm al-Zarqālī (Azarqueil) 1115–1116 — Al-Khazini's Az-Zij as-Sanjarī (Sinjaric Tables) c. 1150 — Gerard of Cremona publishes Tables of Toledo based on the work of Azarqueil 1252–1270 — Alfonsine tables recorded by order of Alfonso X 1272 — Nasīr al-Dīn al-Tūsī's Zij-i Ilkhani (Ilkhanic Tables) 1395 — Cheonsang Yeolcha Bunyajido star map created at the order of King Taejo c. 1400 — Jamshīd al-Kāshī's Khaqani Zij 1437 — Publication of Ulugh Beg's Zij-i-Sultani 1551 — Prussian Tables by Erasmus Reinhold late 16th century — Tycho Brahe updates Ptolemy's Almagest 1577–1580 — Taqi al-Din's Unbored Pearl 1598 — Tycho Brahe publishes his "Thousand Star Catalog" 1603 — Johann Bayer's Uranometria 1627 — Johannes Kepler publishes his Rudolphine Tables of 1006 stars from Tycho plus 400 more 1678 — Edmund Halley publishes a catalog of 341 southern stars, the first systematic southern sky survey 1712 — Isaac Newton and Edmund Halley publish a catalog based on data from a Royal Astronomer who left all his data under seal, the official version would not be released for another decade. 1725 — Posthumous publication of John Flamsteed's Historia Coelestis Britannica 1771 — Charles Messier publishes his first list of nebulae 1824 — Urania's Mirror by Sidney Hall 1862 — Friedrich Wilhelm Argelander publishes his final edition of the Bonner Durchmusterung catalog of stars north of declination -1°. 1864 — John Herschel publishes the General Catalogue of nebulae and star clusters 1887 — Paris conference institutes Carte du Ciel project to map entire sky to 14th magnitude photographically 1890 — John Dreyer publishes the New General Catalogue of nebulae and star clusters 1932 — Harlow Shapley and Adelaide Ames publish A Survey of the External Galaxies Brighter than the Thirteenth Magnitude, later known as the Shapley-Ames Catalog 1948 — Antonín Bečvář publishes the Skalnate Pleso Atlas of the Heavens (Atlas Coeli Skalnaté Pleso 1950.0) 1950–1957 — Completion of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) with the Palomar 48-inch Schmidt optical reflecting telescope. Actual date quoted varies upon source. 1962 — A.S. Bennett of the Cambridge Radio Astronomy Group publishes the Revised 3C Catalogue of 328 radio sources 1 ...
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
Hipparcos - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
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"Hipparcos" was a scientific satellite of the European Space Agency , launched in 1989 and operated until 1993. It was the first space experiment devoted to precision astrometry, the accurate measurement of the positions of celestial objects on the sky. This permitted the accurate determination of proper motions and parallaxes of stars, allowing a determination of their distance and tangential velocity. When combined with radial-velocity measurements from spectroscopy, this pinpointed all six quantities needed to determine the motion of stars. The resulting "Hipparcos Catalogue", a high-precision catalogue of more than 118,200 stars, was published in 1997. The lower-precision "Tycho Catalogue" of more than a million stars was published at the same time, while the enhanced Tycho-2 Catalogue of 2.5 million stars was published in 2000. "Hipparcos" follow-up mission, "Gaia", was launched in 2013. The word "Hipparcos" is an acronym for ""Hi"gh "p"recision "par"allax "co"llecting "s"atellite" and also a reference to the ancient Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea, who is noted for applications of trigonometry to astronomy and his discovery of the precession of the equinoxes. By the second half of the 20th century, the accurate measurement of star positions from the ground was running into essentially insurmountable barriers to improvements in accuracy, especially for large-angle measurements and systematic terms. Problems were dominated by the effects of the Earth's atmosphere, but were compounded by complex optical terms, thermal and gravitational instrument flexures, and the absence of all-sky visibility. A formal proposal to make these exacting observations from space was first put forward in 1967. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hipparcos, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 395 Wiz Science™
Ulrich Schnauss - Stars
 
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Label: Independiente / Domino USA Catalog #: ISOM 68CD / DNO 149 Country: UK Released: 25 Jun 2007 Genre: Electronic, Rock Style: Downtempo, Shoegaze [Original Mastering] I wasn't really sure about this track at first, but it's grown on me considerably. I really need to pickup more of Schnauss' tracks. The Cadillac commercial everyone in the comments is referring to - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXsWeGUJP9M Wallpaper - http://images.forwallpaper.com/files/images/4/4f48/4f483341/373468/beautiful-sky.jpg
Views: 210298 SysLocal
What is MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS? What does MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS mean? MILLENIUM STAR ATLAS meaning
 
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What is MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS? What does MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS mean? MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS meaning - MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS definition - MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The Millennium Star Atlas was constructed as a collaboration between a team at Sky & Telescope led by Roger Sinnott, and the European Space Agency's Hipparcos project, led by Michael Perryman. This 1997 work was the first sky atlas to include the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogue data, extending earlier undertakings in terms of completeness and uniformity to a magnitude limit of around 10–11 magnitude. It appeared as a stand-alone publication, and as three volumes of the 17-volume Hipparcos Catalogue. The 1548 charts include one million stars from the Hipparcos and Tycho-1 Catalogues, three times as many as in any previous all-sky atlas; more than 8000 galaxies with their orientation; outlines of many bright and dark nebulae; the location of many open and globular clusters; and some 250 of the brightest quasars. The non-stellar objects in the atlas are identified by type and designation. The chart scale is 100 arcsec/mm, matching that at the focus of an 8-inch f/10 Schmidt-Cassegrain. Star magnitudes are essentially Johnson V. Distance labels are given for stars within 200 light-years of the Sun. Proper motion arrows are given for stars with motions exceeding 0.2 arcsec/yr. Variable stars are indicated by amplitude and variability type. Many thousands of already known and newly discovered double stars are depicted with tick marks indicating separation and position angle. Other major celestial atlases since 1997 have also incorporated the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogue data. These include Sky Atlas 2000.0 (2nd edition to 8.5 mag), the Cambridge Star Atlas (3rd edition to 6.5 mag), Uranometria 2000.0 (2nd edition to 9.7 mag), the Bright Star Atlas 2000.0 (to 6.5 mag), and the Pocket Sky Atlas (to 7.6 mag).
Views: 47 The Audiopedia
Occultation by asteroid (1331) Solvejg
 
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Occultation of the star 1311-00868-1 (Tycho catalog) by asteroid (1331) Solvejg on 10 January 2012. This is the first observed occultation by Solvejg. The occulted star, at the center, is located RA 05 48 04, Dec: +21 25 26. The field shown is about 1degree wide; north is to the right and east is up.
Views: 162 Aart Olsen
Hipparcos catalogue 4K
 
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data from http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/W3Browse/star-catalog/hipparcos.html
Views: 311 tcy
Why and How the Guide Star Catalog Ended Up in Your Laptop • Alan Goldberg at AHSP 2012
 
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Astrometry is possibly the least appreciated branch of professional astronomy, and amateurs rarely become interested. But we all want our telescopes to point at our targets accurately and effortlessly, and we want finder charts which are accurate and complete. That was the problem which faced the Hubble Space Telescope, and which led to the creation of the Digital Sky Survey and the Guide Star Catalog before launch. This in turn led to freely available digitized star catalogs as faint as any amateur might need. I will discuss the requirements, the solution, and the production of the first GSC, which led to most of the whole-sky surveys and catalogs available today. Alan Goldberg is a member of NOVAC and a principal scientist with The MITRE Corp. in McLean, VA. He's been an amateur astronomer since elementary school, and finally owns an 8″ SCT. After graduate study at Univ. of Texas and MIT in astronomy and planetary science, he worked on the design and operation of the Hubble Space Telescope. He has also worked on Landsat, NASA's Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) series, and NOAA's NPOESS weather satellite. He currently assists the government in buying commercial space-based Earth imagery.
Occultation by asteroid Cheruskia
 
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Occultation of the star 2257-00171-1 (Tycho catalog) by asteroid (568) Cheruskia on 14 September 2013. The 12th magnitude occulted star, at the center, is located at RA 23 43 44, Dec: +27 51 05. The event begins at 7:09:27.037 (UT) and lasts 7.273 seconds +/- 0.042 seconds. The field shown is about 1/3 degree wide.
Views: 47 Aart Olsen
A Day's Worth of the Earth's Rotation
 
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A unique opportunity occurred on March 26th. The Sun, for whatever reason, decided not to rise that day. Whether the Sun was sick, had a hangover, or was on strike, it doesn't matter. It gave astronomers a chance to observe a complete midnight to midnight view of the stars as the Earth rotated along. Watch from a observatory in New Hampshire with a horizon to horizon fisheye view as the sky makes it daily dance. Note: Don't worry, this was done with computer graphics. The Sun did rise that day, much to the enjoyment of all. Rendered using the Tycho-2 Star Catalog and some custom code in Java.
Views: 264 Kevin Gill
"The Gaia mission, two years of successful scientific operation" 08/06/2016
 
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Ponente: Francesca Figueras (Institute of Cosmos Science, University of Barcelona, IEEC). Lugar: Auditorio "Paris Pishmish" - Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria. Fecha: 08/06/2016 Resumen: The high quality astrometric and photometric data already collected by Gaia during these almost two years of successful scientific operation allow us to anticipate that, in few years, Gaia will revolutionize our understanding of the Milky Way and its surroundings. In this talk I will shortly describe the mission status and the contents of the first and end-of-mission Data Releases, expected for September 2016 and 2022. More in detail, we will quantify the expect accuracy in position, velocity and astrophysical parameters of some key tracers of dynamics of the thin and thick discs of the Milky Way. The first Gaia Data Release (Gaia-DR1, September 2016) primes the pump and paves the way for a new golden age of the galactic astronomy. We expect Gaia-DR1 will provide us new parallaxes and proper motions for about two million well-behaved Tycho-2 stars. This TGAS (Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution) catalogue is being obtained using the first year of Gaia data and Tycho positions as priors. Gaia-DR2 (summer 2017) and later on Data Releases will provide excellent astrometric parameters – parallax, positions and proper motions - for sources up to (G=20). This data combined with future radial velocity data from large on-ground spectroscopic surveys such as APOGEE (IR) or WEAVE (optical) is opening a new window to the orbital analysis of the stars placed on the galactic disc up to distances of several kiloparsecs.
Views: 17 Coloquios IA
Catching speeding stars
 
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This video reveals the evolution of stars in our Galaxy over the past million of years. It starts from the positions of stars in the sky 1 035 000 years ago, which were calculated using data from the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution, or TGAS, one of the products of the first Gaia data release. The video follows the evolution of stellar positions until the present day, ending with a view of the sky as measured by Gaia between 2014 and 2015. Highlighted in yellow are the trajectories of six special stars: these are hypervelocity stars, moving through the Galaxy at several hundred of km/s. While it might not be apparent from the video, which shows the motions of stars as projected on the sky, they are moving through space much faster than the galactic average. Scientists spotted these speeding stars from the TGAS data set of two million stars with the help of an artificial neural network – software that mimics a human brain – and they are looking forward to finding many more in future Gaia data releases. These stars owe their high speeds to past interactions with the supermassive black hole that sits at the centre of the Milky Way and, with a mass of four million Suns, governs the orbits of stars in its vicinity. Having travelled great distances through the Galaxy, they provide crucial information about the gravitational field of the Milky Way from the centre to its outskirts. One of the six stars (labelled 1 at the end of the video) seems to be speeding so fast, at over 500 km/s, that it is no longer bound by the gravity of the Galaxy and will eventually leave. The other five stars are somewhat slower (over 400 km/s for the stars labelled 2, 3, 4 and 6, and 360 km/s for the star labelled 5) and are still bound to the Galaxy. These slightly slower stars are perhaps even more fascinating, as scientists are eager to learn what slowed them down – the invisible dark matter that is thought to pervade the Milky Way might also have played a role. The stars are plotted in Galactic coordinates and using a rectangular projection: in this, the plane of the Milky Way stands out as the horizontal band with greater density of stars. The stripes visible in the final frames reflect the way Gaia scans the sky and the preliminary nature of the first data release; these artefacts are gradually washed out in the video as stars move across the sky. Read more on our website: Artificial brain helps Gaia catch speeding stars - http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Gaia/Artificial_brain_helps_Gaia_catch_speeding_stars More about Gaia: http://sci.esa.int/gaia/ Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/
Rudolphine Tables - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
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The ""Rudolphine Tables"" consist of a star catalogue and planetary tables published by Johannes Kepler in 1627, using some observational data collected by Tycho Brahe . The tables are named as "Rudolphine" in memory of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor. Star tables had been produced for many centuries and were used to establish the position of the planets relative to the fixed stars on a specific date in order to construct horoscopes. Until the end of the 16th century, the most widely used had been the Alphonsine tables, first produced in the 13th century and regularly updated thereafter. These were based on a Ptolemaic, geocentric model of the solar system. Although the Alphonsine tables were not very accurate, nothing else was available and so they continued to be used. In 1551, following the publication of "De revolutionibus orbium coelestium" by Nicholas Copernicus, Erasmus Reinhold produced the Prutenic Tables based on a heliocentric model of the solar system, but these were no more accurate than the earlier tables. Tycho Brahe had spent much of his life obtaining measurements of the position of stars and planets to a much greater degree of accuracy than had been possible previously. He wished these observations to be the basis of a new and more accurate set of star tables. Kepler was able to prepare these new tables using Tycho's observations together with a heliocentric model of the solar system and his own discovery of the elliptical orbits of the planets. Accurate computation was aided by the newly published system of logarithms, which simplified the calculations and made them less prone to errors. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolphine+Tables, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 351 Wiz Science™
Gaia: Building on the Legacy of Hipparcos
 
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Transcript: [Narrator] When our ancestors first looked up into the night sky they must have wondered at the band of stars and diffuse light crossing the heavens above them. It probably looked like a distant constellation, but we now know that our planet Earth is part of this constellation, known as the Milky Way. But it is only through the science of astrometry, the measuring of distances and movements of stars, that we are able to map our place in our Galaxy and by extension in the Universe. The Greek astronomer Hipparchus was the first to map the Milky Way. [ Giuseppe Sarri ] "Hipparchus, the Greek astronomer, 2000 years ago, made the first catalogue of stars; which was an important catalogue, which was there up to the Middle Ages. And he did it with the naked eyes, therefore it was really impressive. He could go to magnitude six. And then, with the development of telescopes, with Galileo and the first telescope, we could - astronomers could measure more stars and with higher precision." [ Narrator ] While Hipparchus mapped one thousand objects and charted them on the sky, by the end of the 16th Century another astronomer, Tycho Brahe, created a catalogue of a thousand stars with a factor of precision a hundred times better than what was done by Hipparchus. More recently, in 1967 a Frenchman called Pierre Lacroûte revived astrometry with a proposal to place a telescope on a satellite above the Earth's atmosphere. In 1980, realizing the importance to science of this idea, ESA decided to endorse this project which would eventually be called Hipparcos. [ Pierre Lacroûte - English voice-over ] "I really thought that there was the possibility of doing something in space with astrometry. We worked hard to imagine what methods to use. And then the Space Agency took up the project and then after the work of many astronomers and engineers it became the highly successful Hipparcos project." [ Narrator ] The launch of Hipparcos in 1989 marked a major step forward in astrometry, one that produced results about ten thousand times more accurate than those of Tycho Brahe four hundred years before. By placing a telescope in space ESA was able to measure the position of stars without the distortion of the Earth's atmosphere, which had previously deformed measurements taken from the surface of Earth. Four years after its launch, Hipparcos exceeded all expectations by producing a million million bits of information, which after being received by ground stations in Germany, Australia and the United States, went into the biggest computation in the history of astronomy to produce the Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues. These catalogues of measurements pinpointed the position of more than one hundred thousand stars to high precision and more than one million stars to lesser precision and, as predicted, became the reference for astronomers for the last fifteen years. But it is now time for ESA's new astronomy mission Gaia to build on the legacy. By harnessing advances in technology to build the largest CCD optical plane and the most stable casing to date, Gaia will be able to see ten thousand times as many objects as Hipparcos. It will produce the most extensive and accurate catalogue of the objects in our Milky Way, a hundred times more accurate and all-encompassing than that produced by Hipparcos. This will allow astronomers to create a new map that will massively improve our understanding of the Milky Way, how it has evolved in the past and how it will evolve in the future. Credit: ESA
Views: 33 About Space Only
Do Stars Move? Tracking Their Movements Across the Sky
 
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The stars look static in the sky, but are they moving? How fast, and how do we know? What events can make them move faster, and how can humans make them move? Support us at: http://www.patreon.com/universetoday More stories at: http://www.universetoday.com/ Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universetoday Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+universetoday/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/universetoday Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / [email protected] Karla Thompson - @karlaii Chad Weber - [email protected] Before we get going, I’d just like to say, happy 300th episode of the Guide to Space. Here’s to hundreds more. The night sky, is the night sky, is the night sky. The constellations you learned as a child are the same constellations that you see today. Ancient people recognized these same constellations. Oh sure, they might not have had the same name for it, but essentially, we see what they saw. But when you see animations of galaxies, especially as they come together and collide, you see the stars buzzing around like angry bees. We know that the stars can have motions, and yet, we don’t see them moving? How fast are they moving, and will we ever be able to tell? Stars, of course, do move. It’s just that the distances are so great that it’s very difficult to tell. But astronomers have been studying their position for thousands of years. Tracking the position and movements of the stars is known as astrometry. We trace the history of astrometry back to 190 BC, when the ancient Greek astronomer Hipparchus first created a catalog of the 850 brightest stars in the sky and their position. His student Ptolemy followed up with his own observations of the night sky, creating his important document: the Almagest. In the Almagest, Ptolemy laid out his theory for an Earth-centric Universe, with the Moon, Sun, planets and stars in concentric crystal spheres that rotated around the planet. He was wrong about the Universe, of course, but his charts and tables were incredibly accurate, measuring the brightness and location of more than 1,000 stars. A thousand years later, the Arabic astronomer Abd al-Rahman al-Sufi completed an even more detailed measurement of the sky using an astrolabe. One of the most famous astronomers in history was the Danish Tycho Brahe. He was renowned for his ability to measure the position of stars, and built incredibly precise instruments for the time to do the job. He measured the positions of stars to within 15 to 35 arcseconds of accuracy. Just for comparison, a human hair, held 10 meters away is an arcsecond wide. Also, I’m required to inform you that Brahe had a fake nose. He lost his in a duel, but had a brass replacement made. In 1807, Friedrich Bessel was the first astronomer to measure the distance to a nearby star 61 Cygni. He used the technique of parallax, by measuring the angle to the star when the Earth was on one side of the Sun, and then measuring it again 6 months later when the Earth was on the other side. Over the course of this period, this relatively closer star moves slightly back and forth against the more distant background of the galaxy. And over the next two centuries, other astronomers further refined this technique, getting better and better at figuring out the distance and motions of stars. But to really track the positions and motions of stars, we needed to go to space. In 1989, the European Space Agency launched their Hipparchus mission, named after the Greek astronomer we talked about earlier. Its job was to measure the position and motion of the nearby stars in the Milky Way. Over the course of its mission, Hipparcos accurately measured 118,000 stars, and provided rough calculations for another 2 million stars. That was useful, and astronomers have relied on it ever since, but something better has arrived, and its name is Gaia. Launched in December 2013, the European Space Agency’s Gaia in is in the process of mapping out a billion stars in the Milky Way. That’s billion, with a B, and accounts for about 1% of the stars in the galaxy. The spacecraft will track the motion of 150 million stars, telling us where everything is going over time. It will be a mind bending accomplishment. Hipparchus would be proud. With the most precise measurements, taken year after year, the motions of the stars can indeed be calculated. Although they’re not enough to see with the unaided eye, over thousands and tens of thousands of years, the positions of the stars change dramatically in the sky. The familiar stars in the Big Dipper, for example, look how they do today. But if you go forward or backward in time, the positions of the stars look very different, and eventually completely unrecognizable.
Views: 20909 Fraser Cain
Hipparcos Mission
 
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The ESA Star Mapper visualisation is an exploration of some central aspects of astrometric star catalogues, using data from ESA's Hipparcos mission. Star Mapper can be accessed at http://sci.esa.int/star-mapper.
Views: 214 Kowch737
Hipparcos Catalogue | Wikipedia audio article | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Hipparcos Catalogue | Wikipedia audio article Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Hipparcos was a scientific satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), launched in 1989 and operated until 1993. It was the first space experiment devoted to precision astrometry, the accurate measurement of the positions of celestial objects on the sky. This permitted the accurate determination of proper motions and parallaxes of stars, allowing a determination of their distance and tangential velocity. When combined with radial velocity measurements from spectroscopy, this pinpointed all six quantities needed to determine the motion of stars. The resulting Hipparcos Catalogue, a high-precision catalogue of more than 118,200 stars, was published in 1997. The lower-precision Tycho Catalogue of more than a million stars was published at the same time, while the enhanced Tycho-2 Catalogue of 2.5 million stars was published in 2000. Hipparcos' follow-up mission, Gaia, was launched in 2013. The word "Hipparcos" is an acronym for High precision parallax collecting satellite and also a reference to the ancient Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea, who is noted for applications of trigonometry to astronomy and his discovery of the precession of the equinoxes.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Asteroid Gravity Simulation - Forming a planet with rigid bodies in Maya // Warum Planeten rund sind
 
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Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HellstormDe There hasn't been an update for a long time - but now there is it. This time I'm using the Bullet Plugin for dynamics simulation. Because neither Maya's nParticles nor the Bullet Plugin itself support real gravity I had to write my own per-frame-script to simulate gravity. The script calculates the gravitational force between each rigid body and then adds this force to the acceleration vector of the rigid body. The initial asteroid belt is also created by a self-written script. It creates instances from a set of predefined shapes and gives them a random initial speed, rotation, mass and size. This time I've did the simulation with 4000 rigid body. The simulation ran at a speed of ~ 0.2 frames per second on an Intel Xeon E3-1231. The length of the simulation was 400 frames and afterwards I stretched it to 1200 frames. For the final test I want to do a simulation with 10.000 rigid bodies. The background is a 32000x16000 texture showing the calculated sky/milky way from the Tycho 2 star catalogue. I've created it also using a self-written program which parses the catalog data and adds the real color temperature to each star.
60 Second Space: The Future Of The Orion Constellation - 450,000 years from now!
 
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Stars are not motionless in the sky: their positions change continuously as they move through our Galaxy, the Milky Way. These motions, too slow to be appreciated with the naked eye over a human lifetime, can be captured by high-precision observations like those performed by ESA’s billion-star surveyor, Gaia. By measuring their current movements, we can reconstruct the past trajectories of stars through the Milky Way to study the origins of our Galaxy, and even estimate stellar paths millions of years into the future. This video provides us with a glimpse over the coming 450 000 years, showing the expected evolution of a familiar patch of the sky, featuring the constellation of Orion, the Hunter. The portion of the sky depicted in the video measures 40 x 20º – as a comparison, the diameter of the full Moon in the sky is about half a degree. Gaia's all-sky view Amid a myriad of drifting stars, the shape of Orion as defined by its brightest stars is slowly rearranged into a new pattern as time goes by, revealing how constellations are ephemeral. The red supergiant star Betelgeuse is visible at the centre towards the top of the frame at the beginning of the video (represented in a yellow–orange hue). According to its current motion, the star will move out of this field of view in about 100 000 years. The Universe has a much harsher fate in store for Betelgeuse, which is expected to explode as a supernova within the next million of years. More of the stars shown in this view will have exploded as supernovas before the end of the video, while others might be still evolving towards that end, like Orion’s blue supergiant, Rigel, visible as the bright star in the lower left, or the red giant Aldebaran, which is part of the constellation Taurus, and can be seen crossing the lower part of the frame from right to left. Many new stars will also have been born from the Orion molecular cloud, a mixture of gas and dust that is not directly seen by Gaia – it can be identified as dark patches against the backdrop of stars – but shines brightly at infrared wavelengths. The birth and demise of stars are not shown in the video. The Hyades cluster, a group of stars that are physically bound together and are also part of the Taurus constellation, slowly makes its way from the lower right corner to the upper left. The new video is based on data from the Tycho–Gaia Astrometric Solution, a resource that lists distances and motions for two million stars in common between Gaia’s first data release and the Tycho-2 Catalogue from the Hipparcos mission. Additional information from ground-based observations were included, as well as data from the Hipparcos catalogue for the brightest stars in the view. Copyright ESA/Gaia/DPAC Subscribe For More Videos Like This: http://www.youtube.com/user/ouramazingspace?sub_confirmation=1 See my latest videos : https://www.youtube.com/user/ouramazingspace/videos Bringing you the BEST Space and Astronomy videos online. Showcasing videos and images from the likes of NASA,ESA,Hubble etc. Join me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/spaceisamazing Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmazingSpace2 Google+ : http://goo.gl/1WCBn9 Music by Keving Macleod http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/
Views: 6685 Space Videos
Galaxy Navigator 3D
 
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Best viewed in full HD 1920x1080, fullscreen, though TBH video compression RUINS this clip :( NOTE: Every single dot or speck of light you see in this video represents a real, catalogued star! Check out the Galaxy Navigator 3D for the real thing, at http://mmix.me/galaxy-navigator-3d/ In September 2016 ESA, the European Space Agency, released a first taster of the data being amassed by its Gaia satellite. The satellite had been collecting data for more than a year, enough to accurately determine the sky positions of 1 billion stars. Since had been collecting data for only one year, there was not sufficient information to calculate the actual positions in space yet. However, using data from a previous mission (Tycho-2) a subset of the Gaia data was released containing (among other) the precise positions in space of more than 2 million stars. Galaxy Navigator 3D is a completely free software application that can load these data files released by ESA into its memory, and display the stars. You can navigate the stars (the Milky Way!) and get a feel for just how big the galaxy is. Note: Video compressors (codecs) generally have a hard time encoding high-entropy clips like this one, so as expected, the stars are rather smudged out here on YouTube. Uploaded as 1920x1080 50fps. Soundtrack: Hypnothis by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100634 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 376 MMiX.Me
Gaia Sky - WebGL versions
 
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Would you like to know which stars are currently being observed by the Gaia satellite? A Window To Gaia http://wwwstaff.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/gaiasandbox/focalplane Gaia Sky WebGL http://wwwstaff.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/gaiasandbox/webgl 'A Window to Gaia - The Focal Plane' displays in a web browser the stars observed by the Gaia satellite in real time as they slide through the focal plane (more information on the focal plane of Gaia here: http://sci.esa.int/gaia/40129-payload-module/?fbodylongid=1907, note that the direction of motion of the stars is reversed in the figure). The web application contains the Tycho-2 catalog, with more than 2 million stars --in reality Gaia observes much fainter stars as well-- and it uses the analytical attitude of the satellite, which is very close to the real one. This 'A Window to Gaia - The Focal Plane' application is, in fact, a very small part of a much larger application called Gaia Sky (formerly known as Gaia Sandbox). The Gaia Sky is an outreach application which contains a full 3D Universe simulation with its main focus on ESA's Gaia mission. Even though it is still in beta (the first version to be released with GDR1) it already has lots of content; planets, moons, asteroids, stars and even the full Milky Way galaxy. The application is available to download for Linux, Windows and OS X in the ARI webpage (https://zah.uni-heidelberg.de/?id=660), and there is even a 'lite' version running in the browser through WebGL (http://wwwstaff.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/gaiasandbox/webgl/). Astronomisches Rechen-Institut - Univeristy of Heidelberg http://ari.uni-heidelberg.de With the support of DLR and BMWi http://www.dlr.de/ http://www.bmwi.de/
Views: 1172 Toni Sagristà
Личные Счеты ★ Фильм - Премьера ★ Мелодрама 2018. Star Media
 
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Жизнь Инны была похожа на сбывшуюся сказку, пока не случилась трагедия. В автокатастрофе погибают ее родители, и Инна теряет ребенка. Разбирая документы, героиня случайно находит чужое свидетельство о рождении и узнает, что все это время у нее была сводная сестра – Яна. Инна решает разыскать сестру. Яна оказывается полной противоположностью Инны. Она выросла в деревне практически в нищете и до сих пор обижена на бросившую ее мать. Инна надеется искупить вину матери – приглашает сестру в свой дом, одаривает подарками и устраивает на работу. Энтузиазм Инны не разделяет ее муж Вадим, предупреждая, что та получит от сестры лишь черную неблагодарность. И как может быть по-другому, когда на кону - большое наследство? Режиссёр: Алина Чеботарева Страна: Россия Год: 2018 В ролях: Ирина Таранник, Михаил Химичев, Александр Никитин, Екатерина Долгова, Нина Гогаева, Анастасия Чепелюк, Татьяна Виноградова, Никита Абдулов, Анна Максимова, Марина Коломина Смотреть онлайн бесплатно: Личные Счеты https://youtu.be/WfvR_t2hKjE Онлайн-кинотеатр StarMedia на YouTube https://www.youtube.com/starmedia Смотреть онлайн фильмы и сериалы бесплатно в хорошем качестве. https://www.starmediafilm.com Лучшие русские фильмы и сериалы, лучшие мелодрамы, военные фильмы, новинки кино, фильмы с русскими и английскими субтитрами — смотреть онлайн бесплатно в хорошем качестве в онлайн кинотеатре StarMedia на YouTube. Приятного просмотра! Star Media в социальных сетях: https://www.facebook.com/starmediacompany https://vk.com/starmediafilm http://www.odnoklassniki.ru/starmedia https://plus.google.com/+StarmediafilmRu https://twitter.com/StarMedia_2006 https://goo.gl/HqjdFy #StarMedia
Views: 99512 Star Media
Hipparcos catalogue | Wikipedia audio article | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Hipparcos catalogue | Wikipedia audio article Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Hipparcos was a scientific satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), launched in 1989 and operated until 1993. It was the first space experiment devoted to precision astrometry, the accurate measurement of the positions of celestial objects on the sky. This permitted the accurate determination of proper motions and parallaxes of stars, allowing a determination of their distance and tangential velocity. When combined with radial velocity measurements from spectroscopy, this pinpointed all six quantities needed to determine the motion of stars. The resulting Hipparcos Catalogue, a high-precision catalogue of more than 118,200 stars, was published in 1997. The lower-precision Tycho Catalogue of more than a million stars was published at the same time, while the enhanced Tycho-2 Catalogue of 2.5 million stars was published in 2000. Hipparcos' follow-up mission, Gaia, was launched in 2013. The word "Hipparcos" is an acronym for High precision parallax collecting satellite and also a reference to the ancient Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea, who is noted for applications of trigonometry to astronomy and his discovery of the precession of the equinoxes.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Comparison between Gaia’s first and second data releases
 
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A virtual journey, from our Solar System through our Milky Way Galaxy, based on data from the first (left) and second (right) release of ESA’s Gaia satellite. The journey starts by looking back at the Sun, moving away and travelling between the stars. A comparison between the two views shows the huge increase in number of stars and distances from the Sun between the two data releases. The view on the left is based on the 3D position of 1.4 million stars for which parallaxes had been estimated using the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS) as part of the first Gaia data release, published in 2016. The view on the right is based on the 3D position of nearly 97 million stars from the second data release, published in 2018. The majority of these stars have the most accurate parallax measurements in the dataset, which can be used to directly estimate distances to individual stars. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC Acknowledgement: Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC); Gaia Sky; S. Jordan / T. Sagristà, Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany
Views: 3243 Ethan Siegel
How Gravity works - Formation of the moon Test 2
 
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This is second test render of the next particle gravity simulation. It looks like I should recalculate the simulation at half speed. The dices are a bit too fast. Also the camera needs still some improvement, the background stars will get a higher resolution in the final version. The animation shows the formation of our moon. Our earth collided with a Mars-sized protoplanet called "Theia". The material was blown into space - and orbiting our protoplanetary earth - and eventually formed our moon as a result of gravitational forces. Of course this didn't happened that fast and not instantaenously after the collision - but it would be too long for a short simulation. The simulation was done using Autodesk Maya and nParticles. The particles got replaced my many dice, as shown in my previous animation about this topic. The background was also created by myself. I've written a small program that reads out data from the Tycho 2 catalog (~2,500,000 stars of our milky way) and displays them using a correctly mapped spherical texture - also the star color should be pretty accurate as I also used the real surface temperature as color output (calculated from BT mag and VT mag values). If you have any further questions - just ask me. :-)
Classroom Aid - Supernova RCW 86
 
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Text in 'How far away is it - Supernovae and Star Clusters' document http://howfarawayisit.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Star-Clusters-and-Supernova-v2.pdf In this segment of our “How far away is it” video book, we cover Supernovae and star clusters. As we start Supernovae, we compare the magnitude of the exploding star that created the Helix Planetary Nebula with the explosion that created the Crab Nebula. We take the opportunity to describe the size and densities of White Dwarfs as compared to Neutron Stars. We also take a look at what the daytime sky might look like if Betelgeuse were to supernova. We then cover the Neutron Star that that a star supernova leaves behind. We take a deep look at the Crab Nebula’ Neutron star and cover the full spectrum view of the nebula from radio waves to x-rays. We then take a look at the beautiful Veil Nebula and the Cygnus Loop. We then explain what a Type 1a Supernova is and how it works as a critically important standard candle. We show a binary star system with matter flowing through the L1 Lagrange point, and mention Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar’s solution to Einstein’s equations. We then take a look at the amazing remnants of past supernova explosions scattered across our galaxy including: SN 1006, RCW 86, Tycho Supernova SN 1572, Cassiopeia A with its Light Echoes, RCW 103 with its Magnetar, Kepler's supernova SN 1604, N 63A, and Supernova 1987A. For RCW 103, we illustrate the impact on the Earth if it were Capella that went supernova. We conclude this section on SN with a look at how we find them with transient facilities like the Zwicky Transient Facility at the Palomar Observatory. We continue on to Star Clusters by pointing out that there are two primary kinds of star clusters: open cluster and globular cluster. We visit some very beautiful open clusters including: the Pleiades, the Jewel Box (NGC 4755), Pismis 24 in NGC 6357, and NGC 6791. And then we visit some spectacular globular clusters including: 47 Tucanae, Omega Centauri, the Quintuplet, and Arches cluster with the Pistol Star, and M30. We conclude by adding brightest globular clusters and Type 1a Supernova as key standard candle rungs on our distance ladder.
Views: 1368 David Butler
Timeline of astronomical maps, catalogs, and surveys
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Timeline of astronomical maps, catalogs and surveys ca.1800 BC — Babylonian star catalog .ca.1370 BC; Observations for the Babylonia MUL.APIN .. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 23 WikiWikiup
Celestial equator
 
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"Celestial equator" is a free planetarium software that can help you to explore the star sky from any location on Earth. It provides an accurate graphical simulation for many objects such as stars, constellations, Sun, Moon, etc; photo-realistic horizon panorama, large star catalog, easy to use interface, various zoom levels for star map. This virtual planetarium is the good tool for anybody interested in astronomy. "Celestial equator" app is now available for download on the Google Play Store : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=database.star.citizen2099.earth.celestial_equator
Views: 3076 Earth citizen 2099