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The Alaska Purchase Explained
 
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Here's the story of how the United States acquired Alaska. If you like these Story Time videos, please subscribe to my podcast! http://iammrbeat.podomatic.com. Music by Electric Needle Room. http://www.electricneedleroom.com. All images in the public domain. The decision to buy Alaska from Russia in 1867 has mostly been considered a good deal for the United States. The U.S. bought Alaska for $7.2 million, which in 2015 dollars is actually $180.5 million, and that still sounds like a good deal when you consider that the state produces $10s of billions of dollars worth of goods and services every year. However, at least one economist may disagree with that claim that it was actually a good deal. Here’s the story of the Alaska Purchase Once upon a time, there was a country called Russia that grew and expanded its empire across the North American continent. From 1733 to 1867, Russia colonized as far south as modern-day California and two ports in Hawaii. Their North American settlements were called Russian America. However, in 1856, Russia was broke and weakened after the Crimean War, and they also feared that Russian America might be an easy target for the increasing British settlers in British Columbia in any future war that might break out. Resources available there were increasingly less profitable, and plus, hardly any Russians lived there anyway. Therefore, they looked to get rid of Russian America by selling it to the United States. The American Civil War delayed the sale, but after the war ended, U.S. Secretary of State William Seward met in Washington with Russian Minister Eduard de Stoeckl to negotiate a deal. After staying up all night negotiating, the two agreed to a deal, signing a treaty at 4 a.m. on March 30, 1867, with the United States buying the territory for $7.2 million, or about 2 cents per acre. (50 cents an acre in today’s money due to inflation). The Senate approved the purchase on April 9th, and President Andrew Johnson signed the treaty on May 28th. Americans chose to call the area Alaska, an Aleut name. The land, an area over twice the size of Texas, officially joined the country on October 18, 1867. Some people were angry and in shock. These critics of the purchase of Alaska even famously called it “Seward’s Folly,” or “Seward’s Icebox,” basically saying that was a lot of money to spend for an area with not much to offer. They argued no one would be able to move there and it’d also be hard to control and defend, being so far away. Yet other Americans said it was a wise move, not just for the potential resources hidden there but for the potential to next try to take over British Columbia. After the purchase, pretty much all of the Russians who lived in Alaska moved back to Russia. Not many Americans lived there either. That is, until Joe Juneau discovered gold there in 1880, and Americans finally began to migrate there. Later they came for the oil, and today Alaska is a very desirable place for many Americans to live, so much more than just an “icebox.” Was the purchase of Alaska really a good deal, or did Seward actually get ripped off? For the past 125 years or so, most people have agreed that it was a very good deal. However, in 2009, David Barker, an economist at Iowa University, shook things up when he made the controversial claim that challenged that narrative. Barker claimed that the Alaska purchase wasn’t really that good of deal after all, and that the economic benefits from Alaska could have been there for the United States without having to control it all along. Ultimately, though, I see Alaska joining the United States as a fantastic thing. Without that happening, we likely today wouldn’t have one of my favorite shows on television- Alaska State Troopers. For that, we thank you, William Seward.
Views: 61011 Mr. Beat
Alaska: "Seward's Folly" - Decades TV Network
 
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The U.S. purchased Alaska on March 30, 1867. Secretary of State William H. Seward brokered the deal with Russia for $7 million, which equaled two cents an acre. The deal almost didn’t pass the Senate and was mocked in Congress. They called the new territory “Seward’s Folly” or “Seward’s Icebox.” People started looking at Alaska differently in the late 1890’s when gold was discovered during the Klondike Rush. But nearly a century would go by before it would officially become the 49th state on January 3, 1959.
Views: 18373 Decades TV Network
Russia Gave Us a Discount on Alaska
 
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Many ridiculed Secretary of State William Seward for purchasing Alaska from Russia in 1867. But he turned out to be quite the shrewd businessman. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Alaska http://bit.ly/1lLXV7S
Views: 43746 Smithsonian Channel
Alaska: “Seward’s Folly” - Decades TV Network
 
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The U.S. purchased Alaska on March 30, 1867. Secretary of State William H. Seward brokered the deal with Russia for $7 million, which equaled two cents an acre. The deal almost didn’t pass the Senate and was mocked in Congress. They called the new territory “Seward’s Folly” or “Seward’s Icebox.” People started looking at Alaska differently in the late 1890’s when gold was discovered during the Klondike Rush. But nearly a century would go by before it would officially become the 49th state on January 3, 1959.
Views: 1266 Decades TV Network
1909 2¢ William H Seward US Postage Stamp Scott's #370 Alaska Purchase Folly
 
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This stamp is available for sale. Message me on youtube with an offer or you can wait for the eBay auction. Once it sells I'll put the price in the description as well as the date.
William H. Seward: Abraham Lincoln's Indispensable Man
 
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Although he was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century, most Americans don't know much about William Henry Seward other than that he purchased Alaska. Walter Stahr, author of the acclaimed new biography "Seward: Lincoln's Indispensable Man," shares insights into this powerful and fascinating figure in a July 24, 2013 lecture sponsored by the School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions.
Views: 6890 Cornell University
Alaska Purchase
 
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The Alaska Purchase was the acquisition of Russian America by the United States from the Russian Empire in the year 1867 by a treaty ratified by the U.S. Senate. Russia wanted to sell its Alaskan territory, fearing that it might be seized if war broke out with Britain. Russia's primary activity in the territory had been fur trade and missionary work among the Native Alaskans. With the purchase of Alaska, the United States added 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 km2) of new territory. Reactions to the purchase in the United States were mixed, with opponents calling it "Seward's Folly", feeling that U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward, the primary American negotiator, got the worst of the bargain. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3901 Audiopedia
William Seward, Lincoln's Indispensable Man
 
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Learn more about Seward at http://books.simonandschuster.com/Seward/Walter-Stahr/9781439121184?mcd=vd_youtube_book William Seward was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century: progressive governor of New York, U.S. senator, 1860 Republican nominee for president, secretary of state and Lincoln’s closest friend. Check out SEWARD by Walter Stahr
Alaska Purchase
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) The Alaska Purchase was the United States' acquisition of Alaska from the Russian Empire on March 30, 1867 by a treaty ratified by the United States Senate, and signed by president Andrew Johnson Russia wanted to sell its Alaskan territory, fearing that it might be seized if war broke out with the United Kingdom.Russia's primary activities in the territory had been fur trade and missionary work among the Native Alaskans.The land added 586,412 square miles of new territory to the United States.Reactions to the purchase in the United States were mostly positive; some opponents called it "Seward's Folly" , while many others praised the move for weakening both Britain and Russia as rivals to American commercial expansion in the Pacific region. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Edouard de Stoeckl and William H. Seward License: Public domain ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 916 WikiWikiup
Alaska Purchase
 
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Some deals are worth making.
Views: 8874 terchonline
Seward's Folly
 
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Sewards Folly
Creative Quotations from William Seward for May 16
 
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A thought provoking collection of Creative Quotations from William Seward (1801-1872); born on May 16. US politician, abolitionist; He was secretary of state from 1861 to 1869; remembered for the purchase of Alaska in 1867--referred to at that time as "Seward's Folly."
Views: 1371 CreativeQuotations
William H. Seward
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) William Henry Seward was United States Secretary of State from 1861 to 1869, and earlier served as Governor of New York and United States Senator.A determined opponent of the spread of slavery in the years leading up to the American Civil War, he was a dominant figure in the Republican Party in its formative years.Although regarded as the leading contender for the party's presidential nomination in 1860, he was defeated by Abraham Lincoln.Seward was born in southeastern New York, where his father, a farmer, owned slaves. ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- About the author(s): Unknown Restoration by Adam Cuerden License: Public domain License Url: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:William_H._Seward_portrait_-_restoration.jpg Author(s): Adam Cuerden (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Adam_Cuerden) ---Image-Copyright-and-Permission--- This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 373 WikiWikiup
150th Speakers Series–William Seward
 
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Wayne Jensen of the Alaska Historical Commission discusses William Seward, including a history of his early life, his time as Lincoln’s Secretary of State and as Secretary of State in Andrew John’s cabinet, the negotiation of the Alaska Treaty of Cession, and his visit to Alaska in 1869.
What Was Sewards Purchase Of Alaska Called Sewards Folly?
 
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"What Was Sewards Purchase Of Alaska Called Sewards Folly? Why was Seward's purchase of Alaska called Seward's Folly? The Treaty with Russia was negotiated and signed by Secretary of State William Seward and Russian Minister to the United States Edouard de Stoeckl. Critics of the deal to purchase Alaska called it ""Seward's Folly” or “Seward's Icebox."" Opposition to the purchase of Alaska subsided with the Klondike Gold Strike in 1896. Why was Seward's Folly important? Seward's Folly. ... It was called Seward's Folly because the United States Secretary of State, William Seward, purchased Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million which was considered to be a massive mistake by many Americans."
Views: 606 Hadassah Hartman
William Seward Interview
 
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APUSH Bio Essay---William Seward
Views: 80 Andrew Bonney
Why did Russia sell Alaska to America? (Short Animated Documentary)
 
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/Tenminhistory Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4973164 Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/history-matters-store-2 Special Thanks to the following Patrons for their support on Patreon: Kevin Sanders Richard Wolfe Chris Fatta Daniel Lambert Tom Loghrin Joshua anon Andrew Niedbala Cornel Matthew Mitchell Wildoer Bernardo Santos LavaLampLover3000 Norman A. Letterman William Foster Blaine Tillack Richard Hartzell Will Davis-Coleman Danny Anstess Perry Gagne Joooooshhhhh Henry Rabung FuzzytheFair Armani_banani Jeffrey Schneider Paul Byzans_Scotorius Haydn Noble Spencer Smith Gideon Rashkes Shaun Pullin Richard Manklow Roberto Chance Cansler Andrew Keeling William Olson João Santos In this episode we'll discuss why the Russian Empire opted to sell Alaska to the United States and for what amount.
Views: 292516 History Matters
POLITICO's #ThrowbackThursday: Purchase of Alaska
 
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It was this week in 1867 that the U.S. took possession of Alaska from Russia. Under President Andrew Johnson and Secretary William Seward, the purchase was $7.2 million or less than two cents an acre. James Hohmann with POLITICO's #ThrowbackThursday.
Views: 1310 POLITICO
American History - Part 117 - A Johnson - Buys Alaska - Grant Elected President
 
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Welcome to THE MAKING OF A NATION -- American history in VOA Special English. There was no question about the Republican choice for president. Party leaders wanted General Ulysses Grant. The Democratic Party had a much more difficult time choosing a candidate for president in eighteen sixty-eight. They chose Horatio Seymour, a former governor of New York state. He won the nomination on the twenty-second ballot. Grant got more popular votes and electoral votes than Seymour. He won the election. It was a great victory for the military hero. Yet it also was the start of an administration that would suffer many problems. Ulysses Grant would prove to be much less successful in politics than in war. As Andrew Johnson prepared to leave the White House a few months after Grant's election, he would look back on some successes during his time as president. True, he had lost the political fight to control the re-building, or reconstruction, of the defeated southern states. But he had won the equally important fight to keep the presidency independent from Congress. Johnson also could look back on some successes in foreign relations. During his administration, he got Napoleon the third of France to withdraw French forces from Mexico. And he got more territory for the United States. In the spring of eighteen sixty-seven, the Russian minister in Washington made a surprise offer. He said his country was willing to sell some of its territory in North America. Secretary of State William Seward quickly prepared a treaty accepting the offer. Russia wanted ten million dollars for the land. Seward said the United States would pay only seven million dollars. Russia accepted, and the treaty was signed. The United States flag was raised over Alaska. Many Americans protested the purchase of Alaska. They thought seven million dollars was too much to pay for a worthless piece of frozen land. They said the deal was foolish. They called it "Seward's Folly." In time, of course, these critics were proved wrong. Alaska's wealth in oil, natural gas, trees, fish and animal skins makes its purchase one of the greatest deals any country ever made for territory. At last, Grant appealed to his father for a job in a store. He held this low-paying job until the Civil War started. Then he finally got back into the army. He got his chance to succeed. Still, the years of poverty and failure affected Ulysses Grant. They made him lack trust in his own judgment and abilities. This feeling showed itself when Grant reached the White House. The new president had little knowledge of politics or government. And he refused to ask for advice from experts. To do so, he felt, would show a lack of intelligence. For advice, he depended on close friends. These were the men with whom he had served during the Civil War. Grant had never been able to make much money. He liked and had great respect for men who had. He became friends with some of these wealthy men. He accepted gifts from them. This weakness for money and power became clear when he announced his choices for his cabinet. Grant named a rich businessman to be treasury secretary. The Senate rejected him. Grant named another rich businessman for Navy Secretary. This nomination was approved, even though the man had never been on a ship. Grant named several other rich people and old military friends to the cabinet. Many lacked political experience. Some critics attacked the appointments. One critic "Never was an administration begun with more hope and less ability." The best adviser Grant named was John Rawlins as Secretary of War. Rawlins was a good judge of men. And he was wiser than most of Grant's other friends. He alone, of all those around the president, would argue with Grant when he believed him to be wrong. Rawlins, however, was in poor health. His condition grew worse during the summer of eighteen sixty-nine. Early in autumn, he died. Rawlins' death hurt President Grant deeply. But the lack of honest, wise advice in the White House would hurt the country even more. That will be our story next week, in the next program of THE MAKING OF A NATION
Views: 4004 ListenAndReadAlong
Forum@360: What Raising a Statue of William Seward Means to Alaskans 150 Years Later #402
 
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As the 150th anniversary of the Alaska territory’s purchase from Russia approaches and the capital city prepares for a new statue commemorating the deal’s chief U.S. negotiator, historians reflect on William Henry Seward’s impact on Alaska and its indigenous people. Our panel of historians include Wayne Jensen, Ross Coen, Jon Ross Stephen Haycox and Terrence Cole. John Pugh hosts. This program was recorded Sept. 21, 2016.
Views: 302 360 North
Sewards Folly
 
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U.S. buys Alaska. Brief review of U.S. increasing power in the Pacific.
Views: 1548 John Heeg
U S  takes possession of Alaska October 18, 1867 - This Day in History
 
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U S takes possession of Alaska October 18, 1867 - This Day in History On this day in 1867, the U.S. formally takes possession of Alaska after purchasing the territory from Russia for $7.2 million, or less than two cents an acre. The Alaska purchase comprised 586,412 square miles, about twice the size of Texas, and was championed by William Henry Seward, the enthusiasticly expansionist secretary of state under President Andrew Johnson.
Views: 484 This Day In History
7 Facts about Alaska
 
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In this video you can find seven little known facts about Alaska. Keep watching and subscribe, as more states will follow! You can now support this channel via Patreon, by accessing the link bellow. Thank you! https://www.patreon.com/7facts Learn, Share, Subscribe US States & Territories https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbZJ71IJGFRT2EjuHJUt4-YZ59SZNc8ch 206 Countries in One Series https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbZJ71IJGFRR54b-LlPPw6YcUFiBEEP6G Social Media: https://twitter.com/Sebastian2Go https://www.facebook.com/official7facts ------------------------------------------------ More information about the video content bellow: 1. The first European vessel to reach Alaska is generally held to be the St. Gabriel under the authority of the surveyor M. S. Gvozdev and assistant navigator I. Fyodorov on August 21, 1732, during an expedition of Siberian cossak A. F. Shestakov and Belorussian explorer Dmitry Pavlutsky (1729–1735). 2. The name "Alaska" (Russian: Аляска, tr. Alyaska) was introduced in the Russian colonial period when it was used to refer to the peninsula. It was derived from an Aleut, or Unangam idiom, which figuratively refers to the mainland of Alaska. Literally, it means object to which the action of the sea is directed. 3. The Russians never fully colonized Alaska, and the colony was never very profitable. Evidence of Russian settlement in names and churches survive throughout southeast Alaska. William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, negotiated the Alaska Purchase. In 1867 United States Secretary of State William H. Seward offered Russia $7,200,000, or two cents per acre, for Alaska. 4. In 1942 Japan invaded the Aleutian Islands, which started the One Thousand Mile War, the first battle fought on American soil since the Civil War. During World War II, the Aleutian Islands Campaign focused on the three outer Aleutian Islands that were invaded by Japanese troops and occupied between June 1942 and August 1943. During the occupation, one Alaskan civilian was killed by Japanese troops and nearly fifty were interned in Japan, where about half of them died. 5. Alaska is the United States’ largest state and is over twice the size of Texas. Measuring from north to south the state is approximately 2250 km long and measuring from east to west it is 4350 km wide. Alaska is a geographical marvel. When a scale map of Alaska is superimposed on a map of the 48 lower states, Alaska extends from coast to coast. Nearly one-third of Alaska lies within the Arctic Circle. 6. The City and Borough of Juneau is the capital city of Alaska. It is a unified municipality located on the Gastineau Channel in the Alaskan panhandle, and it is the second largest city in the United States by area. Juneau has been the capital of Alaska since 1906, when the government of what was then the District of Alaska was moved from Sitka. It needs to be said that Anchorage is the largest city, nearly 10 times larger than Juneau. 7. Alaska has some of the greatest landscapes on Earth. It is covered by forests, mountains, 3 million lakes, volcanoes, and about half of all the glaciers in the world. Its wildlife is abundant: brown bears, black bears, polar bears, bisons, moose, whales, bald eagles and many more species all inhabit the area. More Info: http://www.50states.com/facts/alaska.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska Music: Let’s Chill – Always Dreaming https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mlGLGXXSOw https://www.letschill.ca https://facebook.com/letschillcanada Images: https://public-media.smithsonianmag.com/filer/b7/6b/b76b1a3c-c16b-4de6-b698-21027cd40906/sqj_1607_alaska_russia_02.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b2/Welcome_to_Alaska_sign_on_the_Yukon_Highway.jpg http://i.imgur.com/aTXILY2.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e8/Flickr_-_USCapitol_-_Alaskan_Purchase%2C_1867.jpg http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/ww2_11/w38_KiskaInv.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2a/Downtown_Juneau_and_Douglas_Island.jpg/1200px-Downtown_Juneau_and_Douglas_Island.jpg http://wallup.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/10/338698-nature-landscape-forest-mountains-lake-waterfall-snowy_peak-trees-summer-Alaska.jpg Intro Creator: Pushed to Insanity http://pushedtoinsanity.com/portfolio-item/free-2d-outro-template-11/
Views: 7922 Sebastian ioan
Alaska
 
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The Alaska Purchase (otherwise known as Seward's Folly or Seward's Icebox) by the United States from the Russian Empire occurred in 1867 at the behest of Secretary of State William Seward. The territory purchased was 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 km²) of the modern state of Alaska. Background Russia was in a difficult financial position and feared losing the Alaskan territory without compensation in some future conflict, especially to their rivals the British, who could easily capture the hard-to-defend region. Therefore Emperor Alexander II decided to sell the territory to the US and instructed Russian minister to the United States, Eduard de Stoeckl, to enter into negotiations with Seward in the beginning of March 1867. The negotiations concluded after an all-night session with the signing of the treaty at 4 o'clock in the morning of March 30,[1] with the purchase price set at $7,200,000 (about 1.9¢ per acre). American public opinion was generally positive, but some newspaper writers and editors had negative feelings about the purchase of land. Notably, one of those men was Horace Greeley of the New York Tribune. An example of this is a quotation: Already, so it was said, we were burdened with territory we had no population to fill. The Indians within the present boundaries of the republic strained our power to govern aboriginal peoples. Could it be that we would now, with open eyes, seek to add to our difficulties by increasing the number of such peoples under our national care? The purchase price was small; the annual charges for administration, civil and military, would be yet greater, and continuing. The territory included in the proposed cession was not contiguous to the national domain. It lay away at an inconvenient and a dangerous distance. The treaty had been secretly prepared, and signed and foisted upon the country at one o'clock in the morning. It was a dark deed done in the night.... The New York World said that it was a "sucked orange." It contained nothing of value but furbearing animals, and these had been hunted until they were nearly extinct. Except for the Aleutian Islands and a narrow strip of land extending along the southern coast the country would be not worth taking as a gift.... Unless gold were found in the country much time would elapse before it would be blessed with Hoe printing presses, Methodist chapels and a metropolitan police. It was "a frozen wilderness," said the New York Tribune.[2] Washington's viewpoint The purchase was at the time derided as Seward's folly, Seward's icebox, and Andrew Johnson's polar bear garden, because it was believed foolhardy to spend so much money on the remote region.[3] The treaty was promoted by Secretary of State William H. Seward, who had long favored expansion, and by the chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Charles Sumner. They argued that the nation's strategic interests favored the treaty. Russia had been a valuable ally of the Union position during the Civil War, while Britain had been a nearly open enemy. It seemed wise to help Russia while discomforting the British. Furthermore there was the matter of adjacent territory belonging to Britain (and now part of Canada).
Views: 1185 robtfdfbvv
The Alaskan purchase
 
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Documentary
Views: 79 Jay Rodriguez
Unlocking Japan and Alaska
 
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Objective: To examine the “unlocking of Japan” and the purchase of Alaska. Key Terms and People: Isolationism George Washington President Millard Fillmore Commodore Matthew Perry Treaty of Kanagawa William Seward “Seward’s Folly”
Views: 272 Ryan Marsh
How Much Did We Pay Per Acre For Alaska?
 
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"How Much Did We Pay Per Acre For Alaska? How much did Alaska cost in today's money? In 1867, Andrew Johnson's radical Secretary of State signed a deal with Russia, buying “Seward's Icebox” for $7.2 million. At that time, that worked out to roughly 2 cents an acre. In today's dollars, William H. Seward would have bought Alaska for around 30 cents an acre. How much did William Seward pay for Alaska? On March 30, 1867, Secretary of State William H. Seward agreed to purchase Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million. Do you think this was too much to pay for a piece of land that was mostly unexplored? At the time, critics thought Seward was crazy and called the deal ""Seward's folly."""
Views: 85 Hadassah Hartman
William Henry Seward - Bio
 
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William Henry Seward - presentation by Nicole Morrow
Views: 496 Nikki Morrow
Meet Mr Seward
 
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Meet Mr. Seward is a production made back in the mid-1980's by students at Auburn (NY) High School. It is an imagined interview by William H Seward by a modern reporter. The video was recorded at the Seward Mansion in Auburn NY. The actors wore period costumes. Items discussed in the interview is slavery, Harriet Tubman, the purchase of Alaska, the assassination of Lincoln and the attempted assassination on his own life.
Views: 287 James Stanton
Who Owned Hawaii And Alaska Before The United States?
 
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"Who Owned Hawaii And Alaska Before The United States? Who owned Alaska before us? William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, negotiated the Alaska Purchase (also known as Seward's Folly) with the Russians in 1867 for $7.2 million. What was Hawaii before it became a state? Hawaii—a U.S. territory since 1898—became the 50th state in August, 1959, following a referendum in Hawaii in which more than 93% of the voters approved the proposition that the territory should be admitted as a state. There were many Hawaiian petitions for statehood during the first half of the 20th century. What was Alaska before 1867? The State of Alaska. On March 30, 1867, the United States agreed to purchase Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million dollars, about two cents an acre; ""Seward's Folly"" many called it, after Secretary of State William H. Seward."
Views: 78 Hadassah Hartman
William Seward
 
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hey guys Well this is my first video ever so cut me some slack. This is my way to study for APUSH. If you guys have any suggestions for future videos please comment below. Well hope you learn something from this P.S. I own none of the pictures in this video.
Views: 25 Mary Sally
Team of Rivals: William H. Seward
 
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We're counting down to the opening of our newest exhibit at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum "Team of Rivals: Lincoln's Cabinet at the Crossroads of War." The exhibit opens on October 14, 2010 but until then we are providing insight into Lincoln's cabinet members, starting with a look at Secretary of State William Henry Seward.
Purchasing Alaska
 
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Views: 7612 mrjckennedy
Walter Stahr: Seward, Lincoln's Indispensable Man
 
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The Leatherby Libraries presented author Walter Stahr in a program and book signing event to celebrate his new book, Seward, Lincoln's Indispensable Man. Stahr, a former international lawyer and author of John Jay: Founding Father, Walter discussed his latest biography and the research involved in writing the book. William Henry Seward was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century: progressive governor of New York, outspoken federal senator, secretary of state during the Civil War, Lincoln's closest adviser, target of the assassins who killed Lincoln, purchaser of Alaska, and early architect of America's empire. Seward was not only important, he was fascinating. He gathered around his table an eclectic assortment of diplomats, soldiers, politicians, actors and others. Drawing on hundreds of sources, many of them neglected by previous biographers, Seward sheds new light on this complex and central figure, as well as on pivotal events of the Civil War and its aftermath.
Views: 222 Leatherby Libraries
William H. Seward Statue Time-Lapse, Anchorage Loussac Library
 
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William H. Seward was a man with a plan... to buy the territory of Alaska from Russia. They called him a fool~ but I call him a hero! Here's to the man who made it happen. The statue is located at the Z. J. Loussac public library in Anchorage Alaska. Shot on a Canon 7D Mark II and Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 at f22, ISO 100. "Infinite Perspective" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 111 Cecil Brown Media
WILLIAM H. SEWARD'S ULTIMATE PENIS LAND
 
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WHATS ALL THAT WHITE STUFF
Views: 310 Wizkid837
William Henry Seward: Photostory
 
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Made by Jason Gao. This is a short video about the life of William Seward and the impact that he made on the United States.
Views: 219 Amity GoldTeam
What Was Alaska Like Before It Became A State?
 
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"What Was Alaska Like Before It Became A State? What was Alaska before it became a state? ALASKA was a Russian colony from 1744 until the USA bought it in 1867 for $7,200,000. It was made a state in 1959. Hawaii was a kingdom until 1893 and became a republic in 1894. It then ceded itself to the USA in 1898 and became a state in 1959. What was Alaska before 1867? The State of Alaska. On March 30, 1867, the United States agreed to purchase Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million dollars, about two cents an acre; ""Seward's Folly"" many called it, after Secretary of State William H. Seward. Who owned Alaska before the US? William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, negotiated the Alaska Purchase (also known as Seward's Folly) with the Russians in 1867 for $7.2 million."
Views: 51 Hadassah Hartman
Laurel Bill o Alaska Story Time with Aunt Phil, Seward's trip to Alaska
 
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Alaska author/historian Laurel Downing Bill says the steamer Active arrived in Sitka with former Secretary of State William H. Seward and his entourage on board in 1869. Two years earlier he had negotiated the purchase of Alaska from the Russians for a mere $7.2 million and wanted to see the magnificent land for himself. U.S. Gen. Davis held events in his honor, and then Seward traveled to Lynn Canal where villagers at Klukwan gave him the honor of calling him “The Great Tyee” (chief). Seward was impressed with the ceremonial art he saw and presented Chief Klokutch a blanket woven in special emblems of the United States. Historians say it remained one of the chief’s most prized possessions until his death. Seward never faltered in his faith in the value of Alaska, but one episode in his life may have altered the path of the Last Frontier. He was almost assassinated the same night John Wilkes Booth murdered President Abraham Lincoln. Booth hatched a plan to murder not only Lincoln, but Vice President Andrew Johnson and Seward. He thought the process of electing a new president would throw the Union into a state of “electoral chaos” if Seward were dead, too, since only the Secretary of State could set in motion the means for an election. He assigned a young Confederate “spy,” who went by the name of Lewis Paine, to carry out the deed. Paine made it into Seward’s home the evening of April 14, 1865. He raced up to the third floor and burst into Seward’s bedroom, where the 63-year-old was laying in bed recovering from a carriage accident the day before. Paine pulled out his Bowie knife, after his revolver jammed, and stabbed Seward multiple times in the head. I found a woodcut etching of what the attack looked like that appeared in the National Police Gazette in April 1865. Although seriously injured in the attack, Seward’s life may have been saved by the leather-covered iron brace around his neck and jaw. He was maimed in the assault, though, which is why he often sat in profile for pictures taken of him after that time. I don’t think he wanted people to see his scars. Thank goodness Seward survived the vicious attack. If he had died, it is possible that the Russians would have continued to call Alaska its own since Seward was about the only guy who thought Alaska was valuable. Then we would have entirely different Alaska history stories to tell! This segment of Alaska Story Time with Aunt Phil aired on CBS Anchorage affiliate KTVA Channel 11 Daybreak on July 25, 2016. Alaska history http://www.ktva.com/category/daybreak/ http://www.AuntPhilsTrunk.com http://www.Facebook.com/LaurelBillAuthor https://youtu.be/pheKIzhIwwk LaurelDowningBillAuntPhil
Views: 26 Laurel Bill
How Did Alaska Become A State Of The United States?
 
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"How Did Alaska Become A State Of The United States? Why did America take Alaska? Russia offered to sell Alaska in 1859 because they were in debt from the Crimean War. Seward was laughed at for his purchase. Many U.S. citizens called it ""Seward's ice box"" or ""Seward's Folly."" The U.S. did not initially make this purchase because of Civil War debts. Who owned Alaska before it was a state? At the instigation of U.S. Secretary of State William Seward, the United States Senate approved the purchase of Alaska from Russia for $7,200,000 on August 1, 1867. When did Alaska became a state of the United States? 3 January 1959"
Views: 41 Hadassah Hartman
Sewards Folly - by Wideo.co
 
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Views: 543 Victoria Pham
Why Was The Purchase Of Alaska A Good Deal?
 
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"Why Was The Purchase Of Alaska A Good Deal? Why was the purchase of Alaska significant? Purchase of Alaska, 1867. The purchase of Alaska in 1867 marked the end of Russian efforts to expand trade and settlements to the Pacific coast of North America, and became an important step in the United States rise as a great power in the Asia-Pacific region. Why did the US want to buy Alaska? Russia offered to sell Alaska in 1859 because they were in debt from the Crimean War. Seward was laughed at for his purchase. Many U.S. citizens called it ""Seward's ice box"" or ""Seward's Folly."" The U.S. did not initially make this purchase because of Civil War debts."
Views: 94 Hadassah Hartman
Author Michael Dunham
 
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Author talk with Mike Dunham, recorded Tuesday, June 6 at the Mendenhall Valley Public Library. The Juneau-Douglas City Museum presents Michael Dunham, author of “The Man Who Bought Alaska” and “The Man Who Sold Alaska." Dunham presented a slide-lecture connecting key events in the lives of U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward and Tsar Alexander II. The talk puts what is popularly called “the Purchase of Alaska” into the context of the other significant events in the careers of these two statesmen, including their part in ending slavery in their respective countries. It also sheds light on U.S. General Jefferson Davis and Chilkat leader Koh’Klux at the time of the acquisition of Russia’s claims in North America by the United States 150 years ago.
Views: 56 CBJ Juneau
CitySketch - Seward
 
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"One of those spirits who sometimes will go ahead of public opinion instead of tamely following its footprints." Carl Shulz, of William Seward William H. Seward - Billy Bob to his friends, of which there were none - was the 24th Secretary of the United States. If you're going to be a secretary, the United States is probably a good thing to be secretary of. Seward was governor of New York, US Senator, and one of the main figures of the Republican Party in its founding days. The guiding principle of the Republican Party at the time was the basic human dignity of the African people who were brought to this country in chains. Priorities change. As governor of NY, Seward signed laws guaranteeing fugitive slaves the right to a trial by jury in the state and he fought for freed people enslaved in the South. Abraham Lincoln chose Seward to be his secretary of state and during the war between America and the traitors, Seward kept England and France from recognizing the Confederate States of America as an independent nation, threatening them with war if they did. On the day that John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln one of Booth's co-conspirators, Lewis Powell, went to Seward's house to kill him. Frederick Seward, William's brother, tried to stop Powell and was beaten with the barrel of a gun. Powell stabbed Seward five times in the face and neck. Powell was hung for his crime but not before Seward's wife Frances died from heart attack brought on by the shock of the assassination attempt that had almost killed her husband and injured both her sons. Frances had been deeply committed to the abolition of slavery, growing up in a home that was a stop on the underground railroad. William Seward is now best know for "Seward's Folly," the purchase of Russian America (now known as Alaska) for $7.2 million in 1867. He was also instrumental in the purchase of the American Virgin Islands. If it was up to him, the US would have also purchased Greenland, Iceland, and the Dominican Republic. The statue of William H Seward sits at the southwest corner of Madison Square Park. "The interest of the white races demands the ultimate emancipation of all men. Whether that consummation shall be allowed to take effect, with needful and wise precautions against sudden change and disaster, or be hurried on by violence, is all that remains for you to decide."
Views: 4 Mike Power
When Did Alaska Become A Territory Of The United States?
 
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"When Did Alaska Become A Territory Of The United States? How long has the US owned Alaska? Russia controlled most of the area that is now Alaska from the late 1700s until 1867, when it was purchased by U.S. Secretary of State William Seward for $7.2 million, or about two cents an acre. During World War II, the Japanese occupied two Alaskan islands, Attu and Kiska, for 15 months. Why did the US buy Alaska from Russia? Russia offered to sell Alaska in 1859 because they were in debt from the Crimean War. Seward was laughed at for his purchase. Many U.S. citizens called it ""Seward's ice box"" or ""Seward's Folly."" The U.S. did not initially make this purchase because of Civil War debts."
Views: 66 Hadassah Hartman
Who Originally Owned Alaska?
 
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"Who Originally Owned Alaska? Who owned Alaska? William H. Seward, the United States Secretary of State, negotiated the Alaska Purchase (also known as Seward's Folly) with the Russians in 1867 for $7.2 million. Who were the first settlers in Alaska? On Kodiak Island, Grigory Shelikhov, a Russian fur trader, founds Three Saints Bay, the first permanent Russian settlement in Alaska. The European discovery of Alaska came in 1741, when a Russian expedition led by Danish navigator Vitus Bering sighted the Alaskan mainland. How did Alaska become a US territory? The Territory of Alaska or Alaska Territory was an organized incorporated territory of the United States from August 24, 1912, until Alaska was granted statehood on January 3, 1959."
Views: 14 Hadassah Hartman
William H Seward Grave @ Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn NY
 
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The final resting place of NY Governor and Secretary of State William H. Seward . Many family members are buried along side
Views: 1090 welles2002
On This Day - March 30, A Shot Of History
 
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1981 - President Reagan was shot and seriously injured outside a Washington, D.C., hotel by John W. Hinckley Jr. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attempted_assassination_of_Ronald_Reagan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-cKPe7E-wI 1867 -Secretary of State William H. Seward reached agreement with Russia to purchase Alaska for $7.2 million, a deal roundly ridiculed as "Seward's Folly." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Purchase https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nZoaGgjrj0 2002 - Britain's Queen Mother Elizabeth died at age 101. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_The_Queen_Mother https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7uWb5mcyoY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyMwSTP_qF4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqfuuLOfi2U 1945 – Eric Clapton, English singer-songwriter, guitarist, and producer (The Yardbirds, Cream, The Dirty Mac, Blind Faith, and Free Creek) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Clapton https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fnn1dDVmZyQ&feature=youtu.be&t=3m4s Produced by Meiqi AN
Views: 155 Worldcrunch
William Seward
 
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William singing
Views: 113 jessseward97
Petition Demanding Alaska Secede to Russia Gains Momentum
 
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There is a petition circulating that seeks to turn over the state of Alaska back to Russian control. The "Alaska Back to Russia" petition has reportedly gotten nearly 30 thousand signatures. There is a petition circulating that seeks to turn over the state of Alaska back to Russian control. The "Alaska Back to Russia" petition has reportedly gotten nearly 30 thousand signatures. Alaska was purchased from Russia as a US territory in 1867 by then Secretary of State William Seward for 7 point 2 million dollars, and it was officially declared the 49th state on January 3rd 1959. The US Supreme Court ruled unilateral secession to be unconstitutional after the Civil War. But the government usually issues an official response to petitions that get one hundred thousand signatures in a month, which gives the Alaska Back to Russia petition until April 20th to get that many signatures. The wording of the petition doesn't mention the procedure to actually secede, but rather a history of Alaska and who had lived there in the past. Part of it reads: "Groups Siberian Russians crossed the Isthmus (now the Bering Strait) 16-10 thousand years ago. Russian began to settle on the Arctic coast, Aleuts inhabited the Aleutian Archipelago." There was a similar petition circulating in 2012 that demanded the secession of Texas from the rest of the US, and although it got the one hundred thousand signatures, the government refused to pass it into law.
Views: 1780 GeoBeats News